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Posts Tagged ‘saturated fat’

The next few posts will explore the role and important relationships of fat and oils  (together called lipids) in our bodies and our metabolism; what they are, where they’re located, what are “good” fats and what are “bad” fats, and some of the myths and misinformation relating to fats.  I’ll try and give you at least a short version of the skinny on fats.

There’s a story out there that fat is bad. It’s ugly, it’s nasty, it maims and kills, and nutritionally, we should stay as far away from it as we can. Well, guess what? All that’s not true. Fat is our friend  and we can’t live without it.  In fact, we’re “meant” to eat fat.

While water may be the most underutilized nutrient, fat is probably the most neglected, rejected and least understood.  So, why all the fuss about fat?  Because it’s involved in so many (dare I say most?) metabolic processes in some way, shape or form (and fat takes on all kinds of shapes and forms for being such a simple molecule).

For starters, most of our brain is fat (more than 50%), and our neurons could not function or fire without it.  About 75-80% of the myelin sheath that surrounds all of our nerve cells is made up of fatty acids.  Being a fat head is really a complement (to good health).

Fats are highly protective of our organs, giving cushioning and shock absorption to vulnerable tissues and cells.  With all of the jarring and jostling that our bodies take each day, fat softens the blows, making for happier, healthier organs.

Fats are the precursors and building blocks of many of our hormones, that complex chemical web of communication that tirelessly gives and receives messages for our myriad metabolic processes, like growth, reproduction, energy production and storage, construction and destruction of building blocks, fight and flight responses, pleasure, pain and on and on.  What would puberty be like without fat to get things stirring?

Fats are necessary for healthy liver function.  Both healthy cholesterol and bile are made from fat (cholesterol is found in nearly every cell of our body and is the main building block of most hormones).  Bile, which is made from fat, is also responsible for breaking down fats in our digestive processes, so that fats can be easily absorbed into our blood stream.  Bile is part of the great fat recycling system.

Fat is needed for the absorption of all of the “fat soluble” vitamins — A, E, D, and K.  These vitamins are instrumental in supporting healthy hair, teeth, bones, immune system function, calcium balance, cell growth, blood balance and clotting, antioxidant support and anti-aging qualities, amongst other things.

Fats are also imperative for managing anti-inflammatory responses.  The biochemical pathways for both inflammation and anti-inflammation start with good, healthy, and specific fatty acids.  Many practitioners see systemic and specific inflammation as the leading cause of many degenerative diseases, including cardiovascular disease.

Fats supply a slow and steady source of energy.  While carbohydrates burn quickly (like the kindling on a fire), fats burn at a more even pace (like a log on the fire), which gives a much more sustained form of energy (and therefore is more satiating).  Fats actually keep you from eating too much (unlike carbs).

Maybe the most important single characteristic of good fats is their role in the structure of every cell in our bodies.  Each of our 40-50 trillion cells has a membrane which serves as the brain and communication hub of the cell (much more important in many ways than the cell’s nucleus).  This cell membrane is made up of a phospholipid, or fat layer, that helps to protect and define the cell.  When we consume “bad” fats, such as hydrogenated oils, this membrane becomes compromised and the cell does not function effectively.

And, finally, fats  just plain taste good.  Humans have a natural attraction to fats (even though we’ve been told to avoid them like the plague, for the past 30 to 40 years).  Our hunting and gathering ancestors often went for the organ meats and fatty tissues first, and ate the lean meats as “leftovers” after making a kill.  Traditional societies still relish fats as the major nutrient in their diets.

Next time we’ll look at the many different types of fats, how they differ, and what makes a “good” fat and a “bad” fat.

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For this and the next few blog posts, I’m going to be exploring some of the stories and “tall-tales” that have crept up, been created (oftentimes intentionally) and/or have been rammed down the throats of nutritional consumers (yes, you and me).  I’ll be shining a bit of a light (sometimes a spotlight, sometimes a floodlight) on some of the biggest food (and phood) myths out there, with the idea of bringing some knowledge, balance and, perhaps, just a little bit of controversy to the table.

The number seven seems to be common when making lists in books, blogs, newsletters and other informational sources; so here goes: The Seven Myths and Stories about Food and Good Nutrition.  (However, note that when I get through these seven, there will certainly be more bits of misinformation that surface, and I hope that some of you send me some of your “favorite” myths that can be discussed in future posts).

1.  Fat is bad

This is a bad  myth because believing it deprives people of one of the most important sources of good nutrition and health and has created a “low fat” craze that has put millions at health risk and made millions for the food industry.  I’ll discuss what fats are and why they are so critical and why going “low-fat” can be so dangerous.

2. Saturated fats are even worse

This, in a way, is a corollary to number one, that has demonized and vilified saturated fats as “the really bad guys”, when, in fact, they are critical to so much of our natural, healthy functioning,  including good heart health.

3. Cholesterol is bad and causes heart attacks

This is one of the most insidious of medical/nutritional myths and lies, that is deeply ingrained in almost every part of our nutritional/health world these days.  Created, propagated and institutionalized by Big Food, Big Pharma and Big Government to the point where most people take it as “gospel.”  I’ll dig into the history and politics behind this one, and give you lots of sources to explore in great detail.

4. Soy is Good and Good for You 

This one goes right to the heart of the health food “industry” and health foodists and many folks who embrace an “alternative”, seemingly healthy lifestyle, and has been created, nurtured and promoted by Big Agriculture, to the point of being a multi-billion dollar industry.  We’ll look at the major downsides of a soy based diet.

5. Pasteurizing and homogenizing milk makes it healthier 

We’ll look at how Big Money, Big Brother and Big Agriculture have taken an extremely whole, vital, and balanced natural source of nutrition, and cooked, stirred and degraded it into an empty (and harmful) source of calories.

6. Vegetarian and vegan diets are healthy (sorry!)

This may be the hardest, and most controversial, of all the myths and stories for many to embrace.  I’ll talk about these relatively “new” nutritional lifestyles that leave many people deprived of the needed nutritional combinations for healthy funtioning.

7. You need to take antacids for high stomach acid

This one relates to one of the most common dysfunctional problems that I see in my practice.  Another example of how Big Corporations and Big Medicine reap the financial benefits of bad science, bad biology and greed.

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So, here are seven big ideas that will be developed and expanded over the next several posts.  I’ll include links to articles and books and authors so that you can dig more deeply into each of these.

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The Art of Gentle Detoxing

As we’ve seen, toxins build up in our bodies over many years and come from many and varied sources.  Our abilities to handle toxic loads are also quite varied (bio-individuality) and have varying effects in different parts of our body.  There are times when it’s critical to try and detox specific substances quickly, and I leave that to the experts (I don’t recommend intense and quick detoxes on your own).  However, for most people, most of the time, I suggest more gentle detox methods, a couple of which I’ll go over at the end of this post.  For now, a little bit on how toxins interact with our  5 major foundational systems.

Toxins and the Foundations

The Foundations to good health underlie almost all physiological function and dysfunction in our bodies.  They include the primary processes and systems of Digestion, Sugar Handling, Fatty Acid Metabolism, Mineral Balance and Hydration.  Underlying all of these is the most important Foundation of all, a good, healthy, Nutrient Dense diet.  Toxins and our ability to effectively detox play a huge role in the functioning and balance of each of these Foundations.  The following information is mostly excerpted from The Nutritional Therapy Association class binder on detoxification.

Diet

Diet is the main foundation that underlies all other foundations of good nutrition.  Eating processed, lifeless food (or as I call it, phood) is seen by the body as a toxic activity.  Also, any diet or eating plan that takes in too much food (volume) uses too much energy, and doesn’t leave enough for “house cleaning”, also puts a toxic burden on the body.  Finally, it’s important to take in the proper balance of Macro and Micro nutrients because they play such an important role in the body’s ability to detoxify.

Digestion

If a person isn’t digesting well, even a “perfect” diet can clog the body’s detoxification pathways.  Many people eat excellent foods (organic, whole, live) and still have major nutritional deficiencies because the nutrient intake isn’t properly balanced.  Specific amino acids in our diet play critical roles in the proper functioning of specific detoxification pathways in the liver. (for example, Methionine is necessary to run the liver’s Sulfation pathway ).  Poor fat digestion clogs the lymph system, and therefore the liver.

Blood Sugar Regulation

Elevated Cortisol and general blood sugar imbalance stress the Liver and other organs of the body.  This is often a result of way too many carbohydrates in the diet, especially simple sugars and starches.  The western SAD (Standard American) diet and even many so-called healthy diets are highly overloaded in terms of carbohydrate intake.  Blood sugar imbalances deplete many, if not all of the B vitamins.  B6 is especially needed for all liver enzyme functions and neurotransmitter synthesis (epinephrine, serotonin).  B2 is needed to make phase II detox enzymes  required by the liver.

Chronically high blood sugars create a buildup of free radicals and a general catabolic state, which robs the nutrients needed by the body to detoxify properly.

Fatty Acids

Fat tissues are one of the body’s major mechanisms used to store difficult to remove toxic waste (heavy metals, petroleum, other chemicals).  The liver metabolizes fats into their usable forms.  Improper ingestion and digestion of fats can cause liver stress.

Bile is made from healthy fat.  The bile is the “river” by which many toxins are removed from the body via the intestinal tract, so bad or sluggish bile also bio-accumulates toxins.  Healthy detoxing almost always includes creating healthy bile.

The proper balance of dietary fat helps to create a properly permeable cell membrane for all of our trillions of cells, allowing wastes to be removed from the inside of the cell in a timely manner.  Rancid fats create unhealthy cells which help to create toxic overload.

Mineral Balance

Detoxification processes can create acidic blood.  Minerals help to buffer this condition.  Toxins deplete minerals like magnesium, which can lead to deficiencies of enzymes that are necessary in healthy Phase I liver detoxification.

Certain minerals help keep heavy metals from collecting in the tissue. (heavy metals are minerals and therefore are kept in balance by other minerals).

Hydration

We must keep properly hydrated to keep the body flushing appropriately, moving bowels and urine regularly.  Perspiring (another form of natural detoxification)  requires proper hydration.

Proper hydration helps to keep our lung tissue moist so that we can respire healthfully and proper hydration keeps the blood fluid so that toxic material may be delivered more efficiently to the lymph and liver.

A Couple of Gentle Detox Techniques

There are dozens, maybe hundreds, of varying kinds of detoxification methods and techniques, and the internet is replete with them.  Be careful and do your research.  I suggest starting with gentle detoxing unless you’re under the care of a competent practitioner (and even then, gentle is usually best).  A couple of my favorites follow:

Oil Pulling – Step by Step

Step1: First thing in the morning on an empty stomach and before drinking any liquids (including water), put exactly about 1 tablespoon of sunflower or sesame oil , or my favorite, coconut oil, into your mouth.

Step 2:

Swish the oil around in your mouth without swallowing it. Move it around in your mouth and through your teeth, as if it was mouthwash (don’t tilt your head back to gargle though). You’ll find that the oil will start to get watery as your saliva mixes with it. Keep swishing.  If your jaw muscles get sore while swishing, you’re putting too much into it. Relax your jaw muscles and use your tongue to help move the liquid around the inside of your mouth. When you do this correctly, you’ll feel very comfortable. Pretty soon, it will become second nature.

Step 3:

As the end of the oil pulling session approaches, you may notice the oil/saliva mixture in your mouth has become thicker. This is quite normal, since it is pulling out toxins from your body.When 20 minutes is up, spit out the oil into the toilet (outside or in a container if it is coconut oil).  Don’t be alarmed if it looks yellowish–this is also normal.

Step 4:

Rinse out your mouth a couple of times with warm sea salt water and spit into the toilet. Rinse with a good completelely natural mouthwash.   Some people prefer to dilute with water (or use full strength), regular hydrogen peroxide and rinse and spit with that. The hydrogen peroxide is very effective at rinsing out any toxins which may be left in the mouth.

Using Clay Baths and Cleanses to Detoxify

The following comes from Michael King at Vitality Herbs and Clay.  I highly recommend the pyrophyllitic clays from Michael’s business in southern Oregon (obtained from the environs of Crater Lake), because of their extreme gentle yet powerful actions.

External Detoxification Methods

Who would have guessed that Nature has had a simple remedy available to us from the beginning of mankind’s walk upon the earth, for just such a day as the one we now live in? Who would have thought that the answer would be as simple and enjoyable as a soothing clay bath?

There is nothing more gentle in the realm of detoxification than a clay bath or shower slurry (for those who do not like baths). A shower slurry is accomplished by simply spreading a thin layer of a moist clay paste all over the body and hanging out in the shower for awhile. A clay bath is accomplished by adding a half cup or more (even several pounds) to your bath water and basking in the warmth for 30 minutes to an hour or more, as desired. The addition of sea salt and/or humic substances to your clay bath increases its detoxification potency.

A clay bath is a gentle, yet powerful detoxification method due to one simple fact – toxins are able to leave the body through every skin cell from head to toe at once.

More effective than foot baths, more effective than Epsom Salt baths, and more effective than isolated poultices, clay baths draw toxins out of the body simultaneously from every square inch of the skin surface exposed to the clay.

Internal Detoxification Methods

Now, let’s discuss internal detoxification. There are a few natural substances when taken internally, that work powerfully well in combination with clay baths. The reason the two are recommended together is to reduce, as much as possible, detoxification reactions caused by doing too much, too fast.

Detox reactions are common early on in a good healing program, yet eventually the body processes them out and the detox symptoms go away. A clay bath will usually reduce or eliminate any detox reactions within minutes.

A detox reaction can show up in several ways: a sluggish feeling, a fuzzy head, a headache, a rash, a breakout, dry skin, aches and pains, flu-like symptoms, etc.

At the very beginning of an internal detox program it is best to be more cautious due to the possibility of unexpected heavy detoxing precipitated by something as simple as a teaspoon of chlorella, or a quarter cup of cilantro, or a teaspoon of clay, or a pinch of humic substances, or a few ounces of an extremely hydrating water source. From just these small amounts, surprisingly intense detox reactions have been experienced by some with a history of exposure to toxic substances.

By being sure to combine frequent baths with your internal detox program you provide yourself with the best chance of minimizing detox reactions and their potential duration. At the first sign of a detox reaction from an internal detox program, take a clay bath or a shower slurry, drink lots of pure water, and if you have the opportunity, do some sweating in a sauna.

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